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Downs, Edwards & Pataus Syndrome

 

You will be offered screening for Down’s syndrome, Edwards syndrome and Patau’s syndrome between 11+2 and 14+1 weeks of pregnancy. This is called the combined test because it combines an ultrasound scan with a blood test. The scan can be carried out at the same time as the dating scan. If you are too far on in your pregnancy (more than 14 weeks) or the sonographer is unable to obtain the measurement required due to the baby's position or maternal habitus  to have the combined test, you will be offered a Quad blood test between 14+1 and 20+0 weeks of pregnancy that screens for Down's syndrome only. This test is not quite as accurate as the combined test. Screening for Edward's and Patau's syndrome will be offered at your anomaly scan.


Diagnostic testing

Diagnostic testing (chorionic villus sampling CVS or amniocentesis) may be offered to you in your pregnancy, if you have a high chance screen, an inherited condition or a suspected problem with your baby from the scan. The tests will provide information on your baby's chromosomes. There is a 1% chance of miscarriage when you have this test.Our Fetal Medicine Consultants perform amniocentesis in their Fetal Medicine Clinics, if you opt for a CVS you will be referred to other fetal medicine specialist at another hospital. 


Private testing - Non Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT)

If you choose to have a private test outside of the NHS you may find the information available to you via ARC (Antenatal Results & Choices) 

 

What is a Screening Test?
Click HERE for details. 

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Coronavirus - useful information

The latest health information about Coronavirus can be found at www.gov.uk/coronavirus.  Information about our local services can be found on this website here.

From Monday 15 June 2020, visitors and outpatients coming into our hospitals will be asked to wear a face covering at all times, to help us reduce the spread of Covid-19.  A face covering can be as simple as a scarf or bandana that ties behind the head.  It should cover your mouth and nose while allowing you to breathe comfortably.  For more information click here.

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