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 Careers in Speech and Language Therapy

We are keen to support people considering a career in Speech and Language Therapy, whether in a therapist or assistant role. We currently offer a twice-yearly career session to people considering applying for training. If you have actually applied for a place at university we will also try and provide you with a session observing a Speech and Language Therapist at work. 

To access any of these sessions please get in touch with Heather Robinson, Professional Lead for Adult Speech and Language Therapy (tel. 01904 725768 or email heather.robinson@york.nhs.uk).

Further information on Speech and Language Therapy as a career can be found on the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists website https://www.rcslt.org/ or careers in the NHS https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/allied-health-professionals/speech-and-language-therapist

Observation Visit information

To arrange a visit to the department please contact Heather Robinson, Professional Lead for Adult Speech and Language Therapy (tel. 01904 725768 or email heather.robinson@york.nhs.uk ).

We have a high commitment to students undertaking training through local universities, and so are unable to accommodate all requests for observation visits. We are only able to offer sessions to people who have applied for a place to study Speech and Language Therapy (Undergraduate or Postgraduate Level).

Specific information about your visit will be sent to you when the session is confirmed. The following information will help you plan your visit.

Where is the placement?

You will be observing a therapist based at either York Hospital or Scarborough Hospital

Specific information about the time and location will be sent to you. The hospital website contains information on how to get to these sites, including travel advice.

What should I wear?

Staff in the Adult Team wear uniform. You are asked to come wearing smart, comfortable clothes, with flat shoes. Other dress code issues to note:

  • Jewellery, including watches and all rings other than a plain band must be removed when dealing directly with patients.
  • Finger nails must be kept clean, neat and tidy. Nail polish is not permitted.
  • No outer garments should be worn in clinical areas e.g. fleeces, coats.
  • All footwear must be well fitting, provide good support and be low noise in clinical areas.
  • Visible body piercing should be discreet, appropriate and not cause offence.  By discreet is meant small, smooth and not brightly coloured.
  • Only one pair of plain stud earrings permitted.
  • Visible tattoos that could cause offence either to patients, work colleagues, or members of the public, must be covered.
  • The Trust will not be liable for any injury sustained by an employee caused by the wearing of any jewellery.
  • The security of jewellery that an employee has been asked to remove remains the responsibility of the wearer. The Trust is not liable for any loss.
  • Hair must be kept clean and tidy at all times. Long hair should be tied back when working in a clinical setting.
  • Extravagant hairstyles, excessive and unnatural hair colourings are not in keeping with a professional image and as such are not permitted.
  • Male staff should be clean shaven or ensure that beards are neatly trimmed.
  • Please be aware that the hospital can be very warm if you are working on the wards.
  • The hospital has a policy of "bare below the elbows" for infection control.

What should I bring with me?

It would also be useful to bring a notebook to record any observations you make during the session.

Please avoid bringing large bags with you as storage space is tight and the office shared by many. Valuables can be put in a locker.

Who works in the team?

We are a team of therapists and administrators. Some therapists work full time and others part time. Some therapists see a general caseload and others specialise in a specific area such as voice, stroke, dysphagia etc.

What clients are seen?

We see any adult clients who may have communication or swallowing difficulties. These problems may be as a result of a stroke, cancer or a neurological condition such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease etc. We see some clients as in-patients and others as out-patients and have dedicated time for each of these areas. Some of these websites may explain more to you

https://www.stroke.org.uk/

http://www.mndassociation.org/

https://www.parkinsons.org.uk/

https://www.mssociety.org.uk/

What will I be expected to do?

You will be observing all that the Speech and Language Therapist does in the clinic. There will be opportunity to discuss with them their role and your training. It may also be possible to observe other Allied Health Professionals such as Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists or Dietitians.

What can I do before I come?

Contact the department for advice on reading lists etc.

How do I contact the team?

If you have any queries about your placement please do telephone the main Speech & Language Therapy office on:

01904 725768

If you are unable to attend on the day please do telephone our department in advance to let us know.

We look forward to you spending time with our team.


Can I make a suggestion?

We welcome any comments, suggestions or complaints about our service. Your contribution could help us improve the way we do things so please share your thoughts. If you wish to write, please address to:

Helena Perry
SLT Team Lead
York Hospital
Wigginton Road
York
YO31 8HE.

To return to the Speech and Language Therapy home page click here.

To arrange a visit to the department please contactHeather Robinson, Professional Lead for Adult Speech and Language Therapy (tel. 01904 725768)

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While contagious viruses are active year-round, winter is a prime time for norovirus, colds, influenza (flu), and other respiratory illnesses.

 

These infections are highly contagious, so we urge people to stay away unless their visit is absolutely essential to help reduce the spread of infection within our hospitals.

Hospitals are full of sick people, many of them frail and elderly, so bringing germs into a hospital is the worst thing you can do.  We have an active programme of infection prevention but we can’t spot visitors who really shouldn’t be here.  Please stay at home if you’re unwell to help aid the wellbeing and recovery of our patients.